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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 241 (some duplicates have been removed)
, kathy. it's because of her i'm here today and here at the city university. i sworn after i left maryland having left rutgers i would not go back to the university again. i'm glad i have broken that promise to myself and here. it's a pleasure to be on the podium again. we met in the '70s what we were both regarded as a radical scholar. some might not think that anymore. francis and i were asked by james mcgreger burns to be the co-chair of the american political science invention program. we came up with a program that even i think jim burns was a little alarmed by. he in fact put in to action. i have known francis since then. she has remained an honest and authentic voice of progressivism and radicalism with a deep interest with those they have shown -- the homeless and the poor. not how they can be helped but how they find ways to help themselves through the movement and work that they do. it's a pleasure to have her perspective this afternoon in responding to these comments. i'm very pleasured to jackie davis, the chairman of the -- and rachel and members of the executive committee the
we're the champions. and in 6 days our incredible 49ers will take the field with the whole city behind them. my fellow san franciscans i would smut to you our city a vital and strong. this renewed strength of our city and the renewed confidence we're the best city in 2012. the newspapers called us the best place for parks urban parks in the united states and we're among - yeah. go for our parks >> and we're among the smartest cities and the most walkable cities. yes. and continuing the environmental marketplace under our prior mayor we're the green tech capital of north america and the number one for green jobs according to the best magazines and we're also rated highly for losing weight. in the case of san francisco i believe we're so burglarized. the progress of our city is no accident. indeed we're vital, we're strong city because of the fiscally responsible direction we've teen, deliberate choice we've made to attract people into our city. whether it's a reform of our housing or infrastructure on the significant challenges we've faced we put the people's priorities head of
three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly how many people go by some of the busiest areas in san francisco. so, you can see here san francisco, on average total, i think we had 150 people cross our sensors on average for every sensor. in case you want to go into time density. so, we end up getting these really, really great visualizations of the busiest times and the least busiest times of people moving around san francisco. you want to go down into union square? you can see the data changes dramatically when we change the neighborhood. and just illustrates how different every neighborhood in san francisco really is. we're announcing today that we're providing some of this data to the city as a kind of public service to help the citizens here figure out how many people walk around their neighborhood. but mostly it's to help
we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot
how movement in the city can help us establish patterns, trends, and other things. and they're going to share that data with us. and i believe that data is going to be value with us as we figure out challenges like the small businesses along west portal or in terra val, along 3rd street who see their vacancies and they ask the mayor, how can you invest in neighborhood strategy work a little better with us to attract people to come and be customers in our neighborhood, coffee shops, restaurants, salons and other things? how can we do that? we've always scratched our head saying, you kind of have to do it yourself. you have to create your ideas yourself. and now we're saying, well, maybe there is data out there that could help establish some best practices, can help maybe quicken the ideas of what might be more attracted to our smaller neighborhoods. well, this is the kind of data out there, analytics, if you will, the analytical model that are being created by our local san francisco companies like motion loft and others, who are using these data yet can share it with the government a
in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activity of the newest innovations that san francisc
it through the commissioner mar and his office and we will inform you of that and city wi-fi and after doing research into that. there was discussion in this commission before i started here so i had to do real research into this. this commission doesn't take actions on the item. they encouraged the city to look at stuff. there was a committee and media alliance that created a report on that and gave information and numbers on it. both of the groups exist. i haven't reached out because i wanted direction from the body but perhaps they want to work with lafco to recreate the project and determine the current numbers as far as cost and how things work and that might be a way to jump start an issue if the commission is interested in moving down this area. the other area that potentially be added is the black fiber. i know there have been discussions in the city off and on about the black fiber issue so we might want to add that into the mix as well. if we do what i consider in-depth work on this that is one of the items we need to go to outside counsel or help for bec
in room 400, san francisco city hall. council member will skip -- ship, sorry. i am nervous. you have to bear with me. chip will now read the introductions. >> good afternoon and welcome to the mayor's disability council this friday february 15 in city hall. please note that this meeting is accessible and ramp at polk street at the entrance is temporarily disrupted due to repairs. we appreciate your patience during this time and ask that you use the remaining entrances when visiting city hall. assistive listening devices are available and our meetings are captioned and agendas are available in large print and braille. please ask staff for additional assistance. to prevent interference with the sound system and help everyone focus on the presentations please turn off all owns and pda's or in vibrate mode. we welcome the public to comment. you may get a speaker card or please call us and you will be recognized. the meetings are the generally the third friday of month. to assist peoples with allergies, environmental illness or related disabilities please refrain from swearing s
. it is fun to see a lot of the city. thank you. >> hello, and good afternoon. thank you for coming to the industry summit. it is your participation your that makes this work so well. if you look at your program, you will see that our opening speaker is john newlin, president of the entertainment commission. i, however, and not john newlin. i have more hair than john newlin. but i am vice chair of the commission. permit compliance is up. the violence is down. a variety of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be because it has been a good year. as audrey suggests i believe that is because of p
cost effective way to bring rail quality service to different corridors of the city. i know the adoption of the brt strategy by the authority happened in 2003. i want to commend jose luis for his leadership in bringing those projects, van brt and gary brt, to where they are taking into consideration the concerns and needs of the neighborhoods. as chair of the authority, i want to thank you for the services you have provided to the city and county of san francisco. before we make the official presentation and before we allow you to say a few words i want to open it up to my colleagues they would like to add anything. commissioner avalos. >> thank you chair campos. i'm going to be brief because you mentioned a lot of things i want to mention. thank you for your great service and dedication to the city and county of san francisco, and transportation. your mark is been made in the city. i share the same sentiment about the staff, and the level of expertise in helping us make decisions and move forward on a number of key projects. i want to say thank you for your great service
is down. a variety of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be because it has been a good year. as audrey suggests i believe that is because of partnership is up. we want to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several yea
of any major city in the country. i want to thank my colleague scott wiener for helping to showcase the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be renowned for. and those of you that work in our
should take this moment in time and thank in person for their contributions to the city. and i think we have this year's winner epitomizes the kind of person that we should take the time to acknowledge and to go further into that i'd like to actually take a moment and invite now our supervisor district 8 malia cohen who would like to share her opening thoughts on this award. (applause) >> can i just tell you how good it feels to be up here, to look out to see all the people that make everything possible, that really makes san francisco wonderful? and i just have got to give a special shout out. you knew i grew up in the portola for those that don't know. [cheering and applauding] >> right there at the intersection of silly man and colby, my parents still live there. that's where it started for me. but tonight is a night that we have abopportunity * to up lift and support and say thank you to all the people that certainly provide me support and provide me the motivation to get up and come to work every single day. this is an opportunity to thank and praise the people that call me stop,
and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
of how it is the city processes payment and get them back out to contractors is an important issue for us. if you think about the prompt an issue, you can think about it in three parts: when it is that contractors submit invoices, we hear a lot about this; how long it takes for the city to process an invoice and finally the issue of when it is that contractors pass on payment to subcontractors after the receipt payment from the city. many recognize there is much to do in the first two phases of prop favorite, with has to do with how we get contractors to submit invoices in a quicker way. we have created an online system. the second portion with regard to processing in time the city already has a certain requirements around how quickly we are required to process payments for both construction contracts as well as professional services contract. there is a lot work to be done to track how well the city does to standardize; we count that time. and be able to report on that and see how we do. there are opportunities in those two faces.finally in the third area, with regards to how fast pri
: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we star
on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality and meet demand. new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny,
qualities in so many ways. i know the authority will be well served, the entire city and county of san francisco will be well served, especially important as we are going to this transition, as we will find a new, who knows, a permanent executive director that we have that continuity. it is my honor to nominate commissioner john avalos as chair before you. is there a second? seconded by commissioner weiner. any other nominations for chair? seeing none, why don't we open it up to public comment. any member of other public like to speak on this nomination or election please come forward. >> again, every year we give an opportunity to one of you supervisors, to represent our city. i would like to offer a suggestion. the focus on the seniors. i even attended a meeting in our district with ms. abner james, so you know i am doing due diligence. she happens to be the chair the senior commission. the seniors in our city need some extra help when it comes to transportation. simple things like even getting a clipper card; notices have been sent; when the seniors go to [indiscernible] wai
city's best kept secrets on lake twin peaks it's hardly crowded on a day any day you will run into a new lolls and hop on a bus to get there without any parking worries and lolls bring their four-legged fronds run freely with other dogs and a small touch of grass for the small dogs and wild flowers carpet the grasslands keep on the look out nor hawks and ot and before i be a slave i'll be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be free no more violence no more violence no more violence over me over me and before i be a slave i'll be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be free >> i want y'all to sing it with me now. ♪ oh, oh, freedom oh, freedom o freedom over me over me and before i be a slave i'll be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be free (applause) >> thank you. >> thank you very much. thank you. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i'm al williams, president of the board of directors of san francisco african-american historical and cultural society. on behalf of the society and our co-presenters, the san francisco african-american chamber o
how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪@@to the fifth annual awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughou
awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughout the city to make san francisco one of the greatest places to live. the mayor's office of neighborhood services also known as mons focuses on neighborhood outreach and engagement. it is an honor to be here with community leaders who are dedicated to the same principles and are positive
an opportunity to one of you supervisors, to represent our city. i would like to offer a suggestion. the focus on the seniors. i even attended a meeting in our district with ms. abner james, so you know i am doing due diligence. she happens to be the chair the senior commission. the seniors in our city need some extra help when it comes to transportation. simple things like even getting a clipper card; notices have been sent; when the seniors go to [indiscernible] wait in line, sent to 27a, assigned again to 11s to find out that is where they can get a clipper cart. little things like that. you may think this comes under the jurisdiction of the mta; it comes under the jurisdiction of all supervisors so they represent seniors fairly. i hope in general of having a strategy to improve traffic flow now that you will attend to that. i will be attending some of the meetings, not all of the meetings. to remind you again again what is best for our city. thank you very much. >> thank you. any other member of the public alike to speak on this item? so please come forward. >> good morning, my name
i'm ep ending with and oakland is a city of hope that we need help and that is what we need do is support the american dream by making sure that everybody in the city rises and so thank you very much and we look forward -- [inaudible/incomprehensible] >>> my admiration and love and understanding of what the culture is experience i have been here for 50 years, our 50 is one of the greatest cities to ever rise up and stand up if you meet people from oakland, they are some of the warmest people they carry hope, they use fire they -- oakland is a hub of creativity we are who we are we are political, we are artsy, we are musicians for the entrepreneur oakland is the fantastic place to be your base you can relax absorb the culture and create. and you can look for us to be a technology hub going forward and we have never been followers. and have always been leaders. it's a very unique place and a great place to live. i relax by driving through and gatherings and reliving great memorize of being a kid in oakland and then i may end up just parking around little grand lake theatre
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 241 (some duplicates have been removed)